Tag Archives: lung cancer

Can he walk at all?

Okay, he not Iron Man, but he's not that far off.

Okay, he’s not Iron Man, but he’s not that far off.

THE FOLLOWING POST WAS WRITTEN 1.14.15

The Old Man had another surgery yesterday.  The cancer has spread.  The tumor in his shoulder has gotten bigger.  There were also tumors in his femurs, which he had replaced with titanium rods yesterday.

I learned more about bone cancer through my dog, Worf, than I ever hoped to need to know.  Phred told me Sunday that if the Old Man didn’t get the surgery, there was a good chance that he could have broken both his femurs – had he tried to walk.

This is getting very personal – this cancer thing and me. This disease tried to take my mom from me.  Now it’s going after my dad and it looks like it’s going to get the job done.  But not without one hell of a fight from The Old Man…

I want the Old Man to come home again.  I want him to meet my unborn child.  I want to take him to one more Tiger game.  I want The Kid to be able to see him again.  He is too young to lose both grandfathers.

One More Day

When staring in the face if death, I think its normal to think of these things.  I can only imagine what’s going through The Old man’s mind during all of this.

“the son becomes the father and the father becomes the son”

the son becomes the father...

the son becomes the father…

Coming to the hospital, it hit me – hard.

I’m going to lose my father.  Probably sooner rather than later.

It’s been all but confirmed:  he has cancer in his liver, his lung, his pancreas and on his bones.  I’m assuming we’ll get an official confirmation in about 8 1/2 hours when we meet with his doctors.

I’m not ready to lose him, but I can’t stand seeing him in this kind of pain.  The drugs he’s on are making him speak in non-sense;  see things that aren’t there.  Now, he’s talking about things from when he was a kid.  If I didn’t know better, I would suspect that it had spread to his brain; or that maybe he has Alzheimer’s.

The son becomes that father and the father becomes the son.

In the last two weeks, I have watched him transform in sickly, old man.  It’s a pretty surreal transformation to witness when there’s still the spirit of a five-year-old within you who is convinced that your Dad is the strongest person in the world.

I’m spending the night in the hospital room with him.  The overnight nurse suggested that someone stay – partially because of the way the drugs affect him; and partially because of his overall condition.  As eerie as this vigil feels, I have the feeling I may be very glad I agreed to stay with him tonight.

%d bloggers like this: